How to save your neck?

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You are probably doing this when you are studying and scrolling, but it is changing your entire body. The ordinary headset weighs 5kg so that it’s not surprising that keeping it vertical seems like a job. Australian investigators David Shahar and Mark Sayers have discovered that lots of teenagers are growing an excess bone at the bottom of the back of the skulls as a consequence of bad posture. It is the type of growth they would only see in older men and women, people that have a life of adapting to the mind’s load. But young men and women are growing it to support weak muscles whenever they drifted ahead.

What is impacting our posture?

  • Infamous text neck: Looking down in your cellphone makes your throat muscles bend forwards to maintain the weight of your mind.
  • The common desk neck : Our bodies are made for movement.
  • The way you sleep: When you sleep, your body will break in exactly the same position for extended stretches. Sleeping on your back or on your side is usually advocated, sleeping on your stomach isn’t. And it can help to use cushions to support the natural curve of the spine.
  • All that worrying: Tense shoulders often accompany pressure, adding to a neck woes. Yoga and meditation can help you unwind.

It Is more than a pain in the Throat

“Bad posture may lead to cervicogenic headaches,” says Mumbai physiotherapist Dr Priyal Merchant. “Occasionally, if people don’t realise that these headaches originate from the throat, they take medicines or painkillers to treat them without dealing with the origin of the problem.” If your posture is bad, you run the danger of having Upper Crossed Syndrome, a muscle imbalance characterised by weak upper-back muscles and tightness on the front of your chest.

Get your Mind in the game; do these twice a day

Exercises: Repeat 10 times and hold for 10 seconds Every Time

  • Chin tucks: Place your fingers in your own chin and pull it backward on your spine.
  • Shoulder strengthening: Keep your shoulders relaxed. Then, push them back, hold and release.

Stretches: Repeat three times and hold for 20-30 minutes each time

  • Stand straight: Put your right hand on your back (your elbow must form a right angle). Place your left hand on the right side of your mind and pull on your head to the left. Repeat this for the left side also.

Sit right

In a work desk, sit together with your neck upright, elbows close to your torso and back spine. Ensure that the top of your monitor is at or just below eye level. “You should not slouch however, you shouldn’t be arching your back either,” says Dr Merchant. Your toes must also be placed flat on the ground; foot rests might help.

“You must ideally stand up every 30-40 minutes and walk around the office for a brief length of time,” states Dr Merchant.

Get tech to assist

Sit App Straight: Lots of programs and browser extensions are designed for posture improvement.

  • Limber, a Chrome extension, reminds you to stretch and loosen up at regular intervals when you’re on your computer.
  • Perfect Posture (Android) uses your phone’s detectors to make posture readings dependent on the angle where your device is held. It also sends notifications to remind you to modify your posture.
  • The Only Align app (iOS) also finds bad posture and sends you reminders for posture correction. Additionally, it reminds you to do neck stretches at regular intervals.

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